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A civil rights group is weighing a legal challenge to the crime victim rights amendment passed by Ohio voters.

An ACLU of Ohio spokesman said Wednesday the organization is watching to see how Marsy's Law is implemented across Ohio.

Issue 1 amends the Ohio Constitution to give crime victims and their families the same rights as the accused, including notice of court proceedings, input on plea deals and the opportunity to tell their story.

The issue was approved in all 88 counties Tuesday and received nearly 83 percent support statewide. A second ballot issue aimed at curbing skyrocketing drug costs lost in a landslide with nearly 80 percent opposition.

The ACLU argues the victim rights amendment will erode due process rights. Montana's high court declared Marsy's Law unconstitutional last week.



When Gov. Dannel P. Malloy makes his pick for the next Connecticut chief justice, the Democrat will have nominated six of the seven people serving on the state's highest court — a rare feat in the history of the governorship.

Lawyers and other legal affairs observers say the court is rarely partisan, focusing mostly on interpretations of state law that often result in 7-0 rulings.

Occasionally, though, a case comes along that exposes an ideological rift, as it did in a 4-3 ruling that abolished the state's death penalty in 2015 when the majority and minority criticized each other in dueling opinions. Two cases currently before the court may also expose such a rift — a lawsuit against gunmaker Remington Arms in connection with the 2012 Newtown school massacre and a lawsuit challenging the way the state funds local education.

"They're not as controversial as you see at the federal level," said Proloy Das, a Hartford-based lawyer who chairs the appellate practice group at the Murtha Cullina law firm. "Our values aren't all that different across the state."

Das and other observers say the biggest impact of the Malloy nominations may be increased diversity on the court.

Malloy-nominated Justices Richard Robinson and Raheem Mullins are black. Newly appointed Justice Maria Araujo Kahn is one of two full-time female justices, joining soon-to-be-retiring Chief Justice Chase Rogers, who was nominated by Republican former Gov. M. Jodi Rell. And Justice Andrew McDonald, also picked by Malloy, is the court's first openly gay member.


Pass. That's what the Supreme Court has decided to do with a copyright dispute case stemming from a classic football video game.

The court said Monday it won't take up the case involving John Madden Football.

A computer programmer behind the original 1988 hit game for the Apple II computer wanted the court to take up his case. Robin Antonick sued video game company Electronic Arts in 2011 claiming it acted improperly by failing to give him royalties on a version of the game for the Sega Genesis game system which copied his game's computer code. Lower courts ruled against Antonick.

Antonick wanted the Supreme Court to address the issue of expert testimony in the case and whether the games' code had to be introduced as evidence.



An Arkansas inmate scheduled to receive a lethal injection this week asked the state's highest court Monday to halt his execution amid his attorneys' claims that he doesn't understand why he is to be put to death.

Attorneys for Jack Greene asked the state Supreme Court to issue an emergency stay of execution. Greene is scheduled to be executed Thursday night for the 1991 death of Sidney Burnett, who was beaten with a can of hominy, stabbed and later shot.

Greene's attorneys asked for the stay while they appeal a lower court's dismissal of their lawsuit challenging an Arkansas law giving the state's top prison official the authority to determine whether Greene is competent to be executed. Greene's attorneys say he suffers from psychotic delusions, and say the inmate believes the attorneys and prison officials have conspired to torture him.

The judge who dismissed the suit said the law had already been upheld as constitutional and that she didn't have the authority to stay the execution.

The filing cited the court's decision to halt the execution of another inmate, Bruce Ward, in April over similar claims about his mental competency.

"The court should not allow the state to avoid the substantial questions presented here by executing Greene before the court can address them — as it has already committed itself to do in another case," Greene's attorneys said in Monday's filing.



Georgia's highest court says three U.S. servicemen who have been in prison for 25 years for a racially-motivated murder are entitled to a new trial.

A unanimous Georgia Supreme Court opinion published Thursday says state prosecutors improperly withheld evidence that would have helped the men's defense.

Stanley Jackson, a black man, was fatally shot Jan. 31, 1992, in a high-crime part of Savannah. Three white servicemen stationed at nearby Fort Stewart — Mark Jason Jones, Kenneth Eric Gardiner and Dominic Brian Lucci — were arrested less than an hour later and charged with murder.

The opinion says a police report describing a similar racially-motivated incident that occurred the same night after the three were in custody could have helped them. But their lawyers never received it.



Opponents of a giant telescope planned for a Hawaii mountain are appealing the state land board's approval of the project's construction permit.

Richard Wurdeman, an attorney representing some of the opponents, filed a notice of appeal with the state Supreme Court on Monday.

The board in September approved a construction permit for Thirty Meter Telescope. Opponents of the $1.4 billion project say it will desecrate land sacred to Native Hawaiians while supporters say it will provide educational and economic opportunities.

The opponents appealed directly to the state Supreme Court because of a law that allows certain contested-case hearing decisions to bypass the Intermediate Court of Appeals.

Kealoha Pisciotta, one of the leaders fighting the telescope, says other participants opposing the project are expected to also file appeals this week.



Testimony is resuming in a criminal case against Michigan's health director, who is accused of keeping the public in the dark about Legionnaires' disease during the Flint water disaster.

Nick Lyon is charged with involuntary manslaughter and misconduct in office. A judge must decide whether there is enough evidence to send him to trial. The case picks up again Wednesday.

Judge David Goggins hasn't heard testimony since Oct. 6. That's when urban affairs adviser Harvey Hollins said he told Gov. Rick Snyder about a Legionnaires' outbreak a few weeks before the governor made it public in January 2016.

Hollins' testimony contradicts what Snyder has said publicly. Nonetheless, the governor is sticking to his timeline.

Lawyers for Lyons say it's all irrelevant in the case against him.


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