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Alec Baldwin appeared in a New York court on Monday after being accused of striking a man in the face over a parking space.

The 60-year-old actor said nothing as he was arraigned on misdemeanor and violation-level charges. He has previously stated that he did nothing wrong.

Baldwin was arrested on Nov. 2. Police were told a driver pulled into a Manhattan parking space that one of Baldwin's relatives was holding for him, and the two men started quarreling and pushing each other.

The other driver told police Baldwin punched or slapped him. The 49-year-old man was taken to a hospital complaining of jaw pain and redness around his neck.

"Mr. Baldwin is a public figure whose reputation has been damaged by media reports that claim that he punched a man on a New York City street," said his lawyer, Alan Abramson.

"There is incontrovertible video evidence that has been turned over to the district attorney's office that proves beyond all doubt that Mr. Baldwin never punched anyone," the lawyer said. "Mr. Baldwin did not commit any crime and we are confident that once this matter is fully investigated it will be resolved swiftly and appropriately in court."

"Mr. Baldwin is a public figure whose reputation has been damaged by media reports that claim that he punched a man on a New York City street," said his lawyer, Alan Abramson.

"There is incontrovertible video evidence that has been turned over to the district attorney's office that proves beyond all doubt that Mr. Baldwin never punched anyone," the lawyer said. "Mr. Baldwin did not commit any crime and we are confident that once this matter is fully investigated it will be resolved swiftly and appropriately in court."



WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange will not willingly travel to the United States to face charges filed under seal against him, one of his lawyers said, foreshadowing a possible fight over extradition for a central figure in the U.S. special counsel’s Russia-Trump investigation.

Assange, who has taken cover in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, where he has been granted asylum, has speculated publicly for years that the Justice Department had brought secret criminal charges against him for revealing highly sensitive government information on his website.

That hypothesis appeared closer to reality after prosecutors, in an errant court filing in an unrelated case, inadvertently revealed the existence of sealed charges. The filing, discovered Thursday night, said the charges and arrest warrant “would need to remain sealed until Assange is arrested in connection with the charges in the criminal complaint and can therefore no longer evade or avoid arrest and extradition in this matter.”

A person familiar with the matter, speaking on condition of anonymity because the case had not been made public, confirmed that charges had been filed under seal. The exact charges Assange faces and when they might be unsealed remained uncertain Friday.

Any charges against him could help illuminate whether Russia coordinated with the Trump campaign to sway the 2016 presidential election. They also would suggest that, after years of internal Justice Department wrangling, prosecutors have decided to take a more aggressive tack against WikiLeaks.

A criminal case also holds the potential to expose the practices of a radical transparency activist who has been under U.S. government scrutiny for years and at the center of some of the most explosive disclosures of stolen information in the last decade.

Those include thousands of military and State Department cables from Army Pvt. Bradley (now Chelsea) Manning, secret CIA hacking tools, and most recently and notoriously, Democratic emails that were published in the weeks before the 2016 presidential election and that U.S. intelligence officials say had been hacked by Russia.

Federal special counsel Robert Mueller, who has already charged 12 Russian military intelligence officers with hacking, has been investigating whether any Trump associates had advance knowledge of the stolen emails.


The Houston area's courts are going to be a lot more diverse thanks to a group of 17 African-American women and their "magic."

The women, who were part of an effort dubbed the "Black Girl Magic" campaign, all won races Tuesday to be judges in various Harris County courts in an election that featured more black women on the county's ballot than any other.

The "Black Girl Magic" campaign debuted over the summer with a viral photo that featured the 17 women and two other sitting Harris County judges inside a courtroom. Although those two judges lost their bids Tuesday for seats on the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals, they will retain their local judgeships.

Those behind the campaign say it was part of an effort to broaden the diversity of the Houston area's judiciary and ensure that more African-Americans and other minorities can bring their backgrounds and life experiences to the bench and better reflect the diversity of the nation's fourth largest city.

"I think that while Houston itself is one of the most diverse cities in the United States, our elected officials have not always reflected that," said Lillie Schechter, chair of the Harris County Democratic Party, which put together the "Black Girl Magic" campaign. "Having a government that reflects the people, the population is something that is incredibly important."

Lori Chambers Gray, a Houston defense attorney who won election to be a judge on a criminal district court, said the photo and the "Black Girls Magic" campaign provided her with a source of strength and motivation as she proceeded to Election Day.

"I hope that it's an example for women that we do have opportunities to run and to win a campaign," Gray said.

The "Black Girl Magic" moniker has been used as a hashtag in recent years to highlight the accomplishments of African-American girls and women. In politics, it's been used to highlight the role African-American women have played in helping decide various races, including the highly contested Senate race in Alabama last year in which Democrat Doug Jones beat Republican Roy Moore.

The victory by the 17 black women on Tuesday was part of a Harris County rout by the Democrats, who won almost all of the nearly 70 local judicial races and ousted a popular Republican from the county's top elected office.



Australian actor and director John Jarratt appeared in a Sydney court on Tuesday charged with raping a woman 42 years ago.

The 66-year-old actor told the Downing Center Local Court through his lawyer Bryan Wrench on Tuesday that he will deny the charge.

The accuser, now aged 66, told police in December 2017 that Jarratt raped her in the apartment they shared in the Sydney suburb of Randwick in September 1976. Jarratt was charged with one count of rape in August.

Jarratt is best known for his serial-killer character Mick Taylor in the "Wolf Creek" horror movies and television series. He appeared in his first two movies, "The Great Macarthy" and "Picnic at Hanging Rock," in 1975.

It was not immediately clear what sentence Jarratt would face if convicted.

He is expected to formally plead not guilty when he returns to the court for a preliminary hearing on Nov. 29.


Three civilians wounded when a gunman opened fire outside a crowded courtroom have been released from a hospital, officials said Thursday.

The three were taken to Ruby Memorial Hospital in Morgantown, West Virginia, following Wednesday's shooting in southwestern Pennsylvania's Fayette County. The two men, ages 35 and 47, and a 39-year-old woman were all released Wednesday night, the hospital said.

The gunman, Patrick Dowdell, 61, of Masontown, was shot and killed by a German Township police officer. Another officer who was wounded, Masontown police Sgt. R. Scott Miller, was being treated for non-life-threatening injuries.

Dowdell entered the lobby in Masontown around 2 p.m. Wednesday with a handgun drawn and opened fire, authorities said. He had been due in court on charges related to domestic violence.

Miller first encountered Dowdell and was injured when he exchanged gunfire with the shooter. When Miller took cover, Fayette County prosecutor Richard Bower said, the gunman fired shots injuring the two men and one woman.

Dowdell had been arrested Aug. 25 and charged with aggravated assault, terroristic threats, strangulation, simple assault and harassment. It wasn't clear whether any of the wounded civilians were connected to that domestic violence case. Miller, who was shot in the hand, is expected to make a full recovery.



A federal appeals court has dismissed a lawsuit alleging President Donald Trump incited a riot during a 2016 Kentucky campaign rally that led to assaults of three protesters.

Kentucky residents Kashiya Nwanguma (kah-SHY'-ah wan-GOO'-mah), Molly Shah and Henry Brousseau filed the lawsuit in 2016. They attended Trump's campaign rally in Louisville on March 1, 2016.

Security officers removed them after Trump said from the stage: "Get 'em out of here." The protesters were pushed and shoved on their way out. A 26-year-old white nationalist was later fined and given a suspended jail sentence for his actions.

The lawsuit sought damages against Trump for inciting a riot, which is a misdemeanor under Kentucky law. But the court ruled Trump's comments are protected as free speech under the First Amendment.


Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor got some unsolicited health advice the last time she wrote a book.

The justice was diagnosed with diabetes as a child and discussed it as part of her 2013 autobiography, "My Beloved World."

Sotomayor said Saturday in an interview with The Associated Press that prompted a diabetic grandmother to write her. She said she was using newer technology to manage her diabetes. She told Sotomayor: "If I can do it you can do it too."

Sotomayor said that pushed her to explore using the technology she does now, a continuous glucose monitor.

The justice was speaking ahead of the publication next week of two new books she's written: an autobiography for elementary school readers and an abridged version of her memoir for middle school readers.

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