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The Supreme Court agreed Monday to take on a major dispute over the government's authority to force American technology companies to hand over emails and other digital information sought in criminal probes but stored outside the U.S.

The justices intervened in a case of a federal drug trafficking investigation that sought emails that Microsoft keeps on a server in Ireland. The federal appeals court in New York said that the emails are beyond the reach of a search warrant issued by an American judge.

The Trump administration and 33 states told the court that the decision is impeding investigations into terrorism, drug trafficking, fraud and child pornography because other courts are relying on the ruling in preventing U.S. and state authorities from obtaining information kept abroad.

The case is among several legal clashes that Redmond, Washington-based Microsoft and other technology companies have had with the government over questions of digital privacy and authorities' need for information to combat crime and extremism.

Privacy law experts say the companies have been more willing to push back against the government since the leak of classified information detailing America's surveillance programs.

The case also highlights the difficulty that judges face in trying to square decades-old laws with new technological developments. In urging the high court to stay out of the case, Microsoft said Congress needs to bring the law into the age of cloud computing.

In 2013, federal investigators obtained a warrant under a 1986 law for emails from an account they believe was being used in illegal drug transactions as well as identifying information about the user of the email account.


Some of America's most well-known companies are urging the Supreme Court to rule that a federal employment discrimination law prohibits discrimination based on a person's sexual orientation, a position opposite of the one taken by the Trump administration.

The 76 businesses and organizations — including American Airlines, Apple, eBay, Facebook, Google, Starbucks and Microsoft — filed a brief Wednesday encouraging the high court to take up the issue. They want the court to take a case out of Georgia in which a gay woman who worked as a hospital security officer says she was harassed and punished for dressing in a male uniform and wearing her hair short. Jameka Evans, who worked at Georgia Regional Hospital at Savannah from 2012 to 2013, ultimately left her job and sued.

The question in her case is whether a federal law barring workplace discrimination "because of...sex" covers discrimination against someone because of their sexual orientation. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission under President Barack Obama took the view that it does. But President Donald Trump's administration has argued that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 bars discrimination based on gender but doesn't cover sexual orientation.

The businesses' court filing says they and their employees would benefit if the court agreed to take the case and rule that Title VII covers sexual orientation discrimination.

"Businesses' first-hand experiences — supported by extensive social-science research — confirm the significant costs for employers and employees when sexual orientation discrimination is not forbidden by a uniform law, even where other policies exist against such discrimination," the businesses wrote in their brief. The organizations that joined the brief also include two sports teams, the Tampa Bay Rays and the Miami Heat.

The case out of Georgia is not unique. Most federal appeals courts in the past have ruled that "sex" means biological gender, not sexual orientation. But a federal appeals court in Chicago, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit, ruled earlier this year that the law covers sexual orientation. In that case, a gay part-time community college instructor sued after she was repeatedly turned down for a full-time job and her part-time contract was not renewed.

The New York-based U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit is also weighing the issue. Last month, the full court heard arguments in a case in which a skydiving instructor, Donald Zarda, claimed he was fired from his job after telling a client he was gay. He sued under the Civil Rights Act, but previous rulings have gone against Zarda, who died in an accident in Switzerland three years ago. A ruling in his case isn't expected for some time.



The case of whether government leaders in Vermont were complicit in ski resort fraud is headed to a courtroom for the first time.

Foreign investors sued Vermont. The Burlington Free Press reports the case moves to Vermont Superior Court in Hyde Park on Monday.

The lawsuit alleges the Vermont Regional EB-5 Center and Jay Peak were essentially partners in fraud. It says the scheme involved millions of dollars from the investors.

Jay Peak's leadership was accused last year of misusing more than $200 million raised from foreign investors through the EB-5 visa program for developments at or near the ski resort.

Lawyers for the investors and for the state are expected to argue whether the government should be immune from the lawsuit and whether the case should be dismissed.


Court documents show a Wisconsin chocolate maker and the candy giant Mars Inc. have resolved a trademark dispute.

Mars sued Syovata Edari in federal court in Virginia claiming her Madison chocolate company, CocoVaa Chocolatier, infringed on Mars' CocoaVia brand of nutritional supplements. The case was thrown out by a judge in June because Edari doesn't sell any products in Virginia.

Edari sued Mars in federal court in July after learning that Mars was poised to sue again, this time in Wisconsin.

The Wisconsin State Journal reports that a one-sentence court filing Wednesday said the two sides had resolved their differences.

Edari says her company will continue to operate under the CocoVaa name. But, neither party wanted to talk about details of the settlement.



Government attorneys have asked the Ohio Supreme Court to uphold the state Health Department's order to shut down Toledo's last abortion clinic.

The case involves one of several restrictions Ohio lawmakers have placed on abortion clinics in recent years.

The court on Tuesday heard arguments over the Health Department's 2014 order to close Capital Care of Toledo.

The department says the clinic's lack of a patient-transfer agreement with a local hospital should force it to close.

Such agreements were mandated, and public hospitals barred from providing them, under restrictions passed in 2013.

Lower courts have ruled the restrictions unconstitutional.

The court's chief justice on Tuesday asked about an alternative for women in the city of 275,000 residents if the clinic closed. The closest clinic is an hour's drive away in Michigan.



distribute pot products to the state's new recreational retailers.

Nevada's Taxation Department says the protracted legal fight has created a delivery bottleneck that's undermining an otherwise robust marijuana industry and the state revenue that comes with it.

Legal sales started with a bang July 1. But Tax Director Deonne Contine (kahn-TEEN') says the tiny distribution network's inability to keep pace with demand is forcing up prices and sending buyers back to the black market.

She says it's also jeopardizing worker safety at dispensaries forced to stockpile supplies and huge amounts of cash to accommodate erratic deliveries.

A Carson City judge plans to hear her request Thursday to lift the latest injunction blocking licenses for anyone other than alcohol distributors.



Germany's top court has declined to hear a series of challenges to the European Central Bank's bond-buying stimulus program, referring them instead to the European Court of Justice.

The dpa news agency reports Tuesday that those against the program claimed it constituted illegal budget financing and that Germany's central bank should not be participating.

The Federal Constitutional Court ruled that because the challenge was about European Union regulations, it was up to the European court to decide.

The ECB's 2.28 trillion euro ($2.7 trillion) bond-purchasing program is only due to run through 2017, raising the question of whether the case can be heard before the program has already ended.

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